Your Parents Legacy.

Its all in the fingers, or is it?

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Your Parents Legacy.

Post by Slowy »

On Saturday night I asked a 26 year old how she developed a love for classic Rock; effectively her grandparent's music. She said her mother is a radio announcer and growing up, she would listen to Mum on the radio to feel close to her.

Thinking of my own upbringing, my Dad's favourite was Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald; two artists I love to this day. In my parents record collection I discovered the Kingston Trio and Peter, Paul and Mary; both acoustic guitar bands. The sound of the guitar left me utterly entranced and the pathway to my first Martin D28 was clear and inevitable.

What effect has the older generation had on you?
"We were playing so loud that just one note on the guitar was sufficient".
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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by Danger Mouse »

My dad was a massive Clapton fanboy, unfortunately not the good period. I found Disraeli Gears buried in his record collection when I was a young teen, I was pissed that he had an album like that, but forced Lay Down Sally on me instead. I can't stand Eric Clapton. He also liked a lot of prog, a big Yes fan. I hate prog.

My mum loved Bread. Bread was like elevator music, but turned down a notch to be less offensive. Hated that as well.

My eldest loves A Perfect Circle, Queens of the Stone Age and has refused to get out of my car until Fat Bottom Girls finished on the radio. I feel like I'm doing a better job.
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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by Delayman »

My parents are very devout Christians so I was brought up not really hearing rock music at all.

But on the flip side I heard a lot (LOT) of church music, and a good dose of musicals, classical, older tunes etc. and because I showed musical ability early on, I was always thrust into situations playing along to songs I didn’t know in front of people.

I reckon my ear for chords and improvising is a direct result of the church background even though I’ve become a heathen in later life.
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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by Lyle »

Queen's Greatest Hits cassette tape was on heavy rotation in our car. Brian May's playing was a big influence on me and one of the big reasons I picked up guitar.

Once I was a bit older and figured out how to use the record player I got into Dad's rock albums. Bon Scott era AC/DC, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, Sabbath etc.. He would only have been around 10 years old when they originally came out so I'm guessing he purchased them once he got a job after highschool.

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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by The Scarecrow »

My folks record collection from childhood was 70's staples; Elton John, Fleetwood Mac, ABBA, Bee Gees, Cliff Richard, The Eagles, Carole King, Billy Joel, The Commodores, Dr Hook, Leo Sayer, The Carpenter. Being born in '79, they also moved into the stuff of the early 80's like Christopher Cross, Carly Simon, Joe Jackson, Hall & Oates, Michael McDonald, Phil Collins, The Police. Growing up, the family stereo was usually set firmly to i-98FM or Solid Gold.

But it was my maternal grandparents Motown collection that stuck with me a lot as well - Stevie Wonder, Tammi Terrell, The Four Tops, The Jackson 5, The Spinners etc. My paternal grandparents only ever seemed to listen to talkback :) As a young child of the 80's, I had several teenage aunts and uncles, who I picked up my tastes from then; Duran Duran, Inxs, Wham!, Culture Club, but also lots of NZ stuff like Dragon, Hello Sailor, and the epically underrated Coconut Rough (my former hipster band of the early 00s covered Sierre Leone on my insistence).

I tend to find my go-to playlist for when I'm cooking in the kitchen, doing work around the house etc is a mix of all of thee above which chronologically begins the mid-60's and kind of stops around the early 90's.
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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by hamo »

Woo now there's a question. I guess it's entirely possible that I could have ended up where I am on my own, but there's no denying that Dad had a musical influence. He was also an adopter of technology (we had the first VCR of anyone I knew), and that continues to this day. He was proudly showing me the other day how he'd figured out how to record from his laptop screen so he could record something that was leaving Netflix before they were ready to watch it. :lol: This just means that there was always something in the house to play music - a record player, then the cassette deck, finally the component stereo when CDs came around. So I always had access to music.

In the car it was solidly Abba and Queen, until we nagged them into playing the Return Of The Jedi audiobook. :mrgreen: At home I was used to seeing Ready2Roll and Radio With Pictures. When I was old enough I would pull out his Beatles albums and old Shadows 45s. But the lightning rod was when he made a throwaway comment about liking Iron Maiden. Now, Dad would sometimes say stuff because he thought it was cool, but young me heard this, and went and bought him Somewhere In Time as a birthday present. I don't think he was as into it as I'd assumed, so I don't think he minded too much when I absconded with the cassette. :lol:

On top of this, when I was 10 I saw some kid playing violin, and thought it was awesome, so asked if I could take it up. This request was accommodated, and then a couple of years later when I was similarly inspired by someone playing guitar, I asked to take that up instead (it was obvious by then that I was not going to be a violin virtuoso). This was similarly accommodated, and after a year of playing, I came home on my birthday to hear dad strumming away on my birthday present, an electric guitar starter pack.

So basically, Dad had a huge impact on getting me interested in music, exposing me to a variety of music, and getting me started playing music. And I will be eternally grateful. :thumbup:
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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by vintage52 »

My parents loved both kinds of music - country and western.

I'm the second youngest of 5 and was exposed to all sorts of genres growing up.

We had an uncle that worked at the EMI pressing plant in Petone and he would bring all sorts of records home - mostly whatever was current and by current, this was during the mid 70's that all this started.

I have a nightmare memory now of mum pouring boiling water over a record sitting on a cup to turn it into a bowl to take to a party.
I remember finding an empty album sleeve of Kiss's first album.

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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by calling card »

Dad was of the silent generation 1934, Mum born 1941. National radio mostly, Dad hobbyist organ and trumpet player in earlier years. Mum, tone deaf etc.. No music in car, no, Mum talked alot like non stop. We had a suitcase record player and some records that did not inspire.
Me, just wanted to burn petrol and spin tyres. The day I had an instrument to coax noise out of I heard it, the Irish genes (Dad's side) and some form of imbedded rhythm possibly attributed to the 2% west African that lurks in me. Mum's side it would seem.

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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by The Scarecrow »

hamo wrote: Tue Nov 01, 2022 8:30 amReturn Of The Jedi audiobook. :mrgreen:

Still have the LP and book for this as well as The Empire Strikes Back and a couple of other records/audiobooks from that era - ET and Star Wars "Droid World" which might be one of the earliest expanded universe tales. I picked up all the OST's from the original trilogy over the last few years, Empire is probably the best of the lot, which it seems to be in general.

Those record/tape + audiobook combos were like the streaming service of the early 80's... my brother and I replayed the ESB one countless times because it was well before we could get the movie on VHS and years before it would stream on TV. The kid next door had a heap of them around '83 or '84 and we'd happily blast them in the background whilst battling with the Kenner SW figures.
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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by The Scarecrow »

hamo wrote: Tue Nov 01, 2022 8:30 am He was also an adopter of technology (we had the first VCR of anyone I knew)
I remember my folks got our first VCR around '84 - old JVC top-loading job with a corded remote (!) and hued in that silver that was the palette of every hi-fi system in the 80's. We rented Raiders of the Lost Ark and Star Wars the evening of the first day in the house that my folks still live in - Dad told me it cost around 4k to get the a VHS and he put it on the mortgage at the time :lol:

It was actually a bit of rivalry with my uncle/his brother, who'd got one not long before when we were staying on his farm in Cambridge as he was my folks and I would visit in the early 80's around this time as his wife was heavily preggers with my cousin and Dad would help uncle Tim with the milking and farm chores at this time. My uncle got a VHS around that time (I remember sitting between my dad and uncle in the ute on the way back from Farmers in Hamilton with the huge box for it on my lap ) and my dad was stoked to brag to him that when we got ours, it was the newer model with the aforementioned corded remote :lol:

My fam were similarly adopters of tech - we had the first and only Atari 2600 in my street around '82 or '83 after my other uncle brought one back from Singapore during his army travels. I was only about 4, but become the most popular kid in the area as all the other kids in the street would flock to play Asteroids or Pac Man as it was a huge novelty at the time.
Last edited by The Scarecrow on Tue Nov 01, 2022 10:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by sty »

Now that's a weird topic to think about.

My birth parents divorced very messily when I was 10, pretty much never saw my genetic father again, however I suspect I owe my music skills to him since my mother "never had a note in her head" which I can vouch for having heard her galantly sing at many cub campfires over the years before she passed away.

My oldest musical memories going back to when I was about 6 years old were listening to Tubular Bells quite a lot, also a fair bit of Cat Stevens, these were my fathers albums I think because my mum was into stuff like Petula Clarke, Tommy Steele, Nana Moussaka etc. she did also like Roger Whittaker who I like but don't really listen tio.

I've always loved Tubular Bells and own many version of it over the years, was just listening to a 50th anniversary performance by the Royal Philharmonic only yesterday. I only ventured back into Cat Stevens in the last few years and enjoy it a lot more than I think.

I also remember my father getting what I suspect was a Gibson Hummingbird from what I remember of the designs, I also remember taking it to primary school to try and learn guitar and giving up after the first class, looking back it was way too big and I was way to young. Later in life I would study music at high school and play Trumpet/Cornet in the school bands, although I always wanted to play guitar.

After my mum remarried music was a little more around us since my dad had an 8-track in his car and we'd listen to loads of classic 70s stuff, I remember Yellow Brick Road. However by that point in time I was well on my own way with music and had already discovered Status Quo, Queen and Elvis.

The only other legacy of my family was that my new Grandfather was really into Brass Band music, which certainly helped fuel my love of really good brass bands as well as full orchestra music. I'm still fond of the big spectacular classical music like The Planets (as performed by The Halle Orchestra), Night On Bald Mountain, 1812 etc.

My kids are getting a very different upbringing and are both fully capable of singing along to the most eclectic collection of Classic Rock, Heavy Metal, dodgy 80s and 90s hits. It was truly wonderful driving back from Karate last week with my youngest and we both sang the whole of Sweet Child Of Mine along to the stereo, he was a bit better than me since he had been at singing before Karate and I'm just an enthusiastic amateur these days.

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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by jeremyb »

My father was a relentlessly self-improving boulangerie owner from Belgium with low grade narcolepsy and a penchant for buggery. My mother was a fifteen year old French prostitute named Chloe with webbed feet. My father would womanize, he would drink. He would make outrageous claims like he invented the question mark. Sometimes he would accuse chestnuts of being lazy. The sort of general malaise that only the genius possess and the insane lament. My childhood was typical. Summers in Rangoon, luge lessons. In the spring we'd make meat helmets. When I was insolent I was placed in a burlap bag and beaten with reeds- pretty standard really. At the age of twelve I received my first scribe. At the age of fourteen a Zoroastrian named Vilma ritualistically shaved my testicles. There really is nothing like a shorn scrotum... it's breathtaking- I highly suggest you try it.
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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by calling card »

Meat helmet?

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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by hamo »

The Scarecrow wrote: Tue Nov 01, 2022 9:37 am
hamo wrote: Tue Nov 01, 2022 8:30 am He was also an adopter of technology (we had the first VCR of anyone I knew)
I remember my folks got our first VCR around '84 - old JVC top-loading job with a corded remote (!) and hued in that silver that was the palette of every hi-fi system in the 80's. We rented Raiders of the Lost Ark and Star Wars the evening of the first day in the house that my folks still live in - Dad told me it cost around 4k to get the a VHS and he put it on the mortgage at the time :lol:

It was actually a bit of rivalry with my uncle/his brother, who'd got one not long before when we were staying on his farm in Cambridge as he was my folks and I would visit in the early 80's around this time as his wife was heavily preggers with my cousin and Dad would help uncle Tim with the milking and farm chores at this time. My uncle got a VHS around that time (I remember sitting between my dad and uncle in the ute on the way back from Farmers in Hamilton with the huge box for it on my lap ) and my dad was stoked to brag to him that when we got ours, it was the newer model with the aforementioned corded remote :lol:

My fam were similarly adopters of tech - we had the first and only Atari 2600 in my street around '82 or '83 after my other uncle brought one back from Singapore during his army travels. I was only about 4, but become the most popular kid in the area as all the other kids in the street would flock to play Asteroids or Pac Man as it was a huge novelty at the time.
Yeah man, my dad has kept a crt tv going cos he still busts out the 2600 occasionally that my grandparents brought back from Hawaii, except we could only play it in black and white thanks to the PAL thing, and via a workaround switch/cable that one of dad's mates jacked up, since he was into electrical engineering stuff!
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Re: Your Parents Legacy.

Post by crowbgood1 »

No radio in the HQ Holden, so Dad would sing. He had been in a band in the late 40's and knew lots of George Foreman and hits from his era. We were familiar with his set list and would make requests. At home, there was a radiogram and some old musicals - Oliver, The Music Man, South Pacific and the usual Kingston Trio, Harry Belafonte and some Rock n Roll 45's etc. When the 70's hit Mum bought Solid Gold Hits V1 - we were all hooked! Daddy Cool, T Rex even. Well, from then on, all I can say is everybody in our family were Kung Fu fighting.
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