What's on your work bench?

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clubhouse
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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by clubhouse »

jeremyb wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 1:29 pm Tool porn!!! What do you do for a job dude??
Hey Jeremy...are you going to post your knife making mission. I was a big "Forged in Fire" fan (my midweek look-forward-to) before the Choice TV channel was binned. I love making stuff and makers...low tech, high tech, hackers, bodgers, artisans, menders, crafters, fettlers, fiddlers, fudgers...I'd love to get some sort of community fab lab going.

When I get my knife/blade/edge sharpening shit together I'll show you my greenwood slick if you show me your drop-point seax, yeah? :winky:

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by jeremyb »

clubhouse wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 8:49 pm
jeremyb wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 1:29 pm Tool porn!!! What do you do for a job dude??
Hey Jeremy...are you going to post your knife making mission. I was a big "Forged in Fire" fan (my midweek look-forward-to) before the Choice TV channel was binned. I love making stuff and makers...low tech, high tech, hackers, bodgers, artisans, menders, crafters, fettlers, fiddlers, fudgers...I'd love to get some sort of community fab lab going.

When I get my knife/blade/edge sharpening shit together I'll show you my greenwood slick if you show me your drop-point seax, yeah? :winky:
I’ll start a thread tomorrow!! I’ve just bought a Lansky deluxe sharpening kit, excited to try it!
Polar Bear wrote: It will continue to be a mystery as to why this is such a sausage fest.

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by clubhouse »

jeremyb wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 9:45 pm
clubhouse wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 8:49 pm
jeremyb wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 1:29 pm Tool porn!!! What do you do for a job dude??
Hey Jeremy...are you going to post your knife making mission. I was a big "Forged in Fire" fan (my midweek look-forward-to) before the Choice TV channel was binned. I love making stuff and makers...low tech, high tech, hackers, bodgers, artisans, menders, crafters, fettlers, fiddlers, fudgers...I'd love to get some sort of community fab lab going.

When I get my knife/blade/edge sharpening shit together I'll show you my greenwood slick if you show me your drop-point seax, yeah? :winky:
I’ll start a thread tomorrow!! I’ve just bought a Lansky deluxe sharpening kit, excited to try it!
Fabulistic! I upgraded to the Lansky system a few years ago...if you feel yourself falling down the rabbit hole of fine edge fettling, guided systems are great to produce repeatable, and therefore quantifiable, sharpening/honing refinement to your procedure. Get hold of some magnification (loupe or similar handsfree thingy) and check/test your results often...dude, I'm sooo looking forward to your knife journey...I know you'll "do it clean, know what I mean" (Echo and the Bunnymen...Easter reference).

Here's some tool porn for yer...what I'm occupying my tool sharpening habit with this Easter weekend, in-between oogling the drillium, Porsche vid (banana for scale reference...is that still this site's unit of comparison?):


19th Century Greenwood Framing Slicks...fill yer boots, JB.jpg
19th Century Greenwood Framing Slicks...fill yer boots, JB.jpg (2.59 MiB) Viewed 1127 times


They all date from the 1800s. Forge welded tool edge steel onto softer socket-end steel for shock resistance. They were used before the advent of timber, stud framing construction and the move to 'rough' carpentry using nails to replace mortice and tenon/pegged joinery. Not often used in A/NZ, if at all. You'd see this construction method in the timber houses from Tudor England and the barns of the eastern US (Amish dudes still build this way).

This was apex tech, back in the day. Slicks weren't struck with a mallet, rather, hand pushed to finish a tenon off like we might use a plane these days. They are deadly sharp, and if dropped, can easily cut through a leather boot, toes and rubber sole (don't ask me how I know...yeech). I've got to flatten the backs and bring the bevels back on them all. I'll secondary bevel the cutting edges to 25 or 30 degrees for soft or hard wood use from there. Gonna take hours... :thumbup:

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by jeremyb »

clubhouse wrote: Fri Apr 15, 2022 5:01 pm
jeremyb wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 9:45 pm
clubhouse wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 8:49 pm

Hey Jeremy...are you going to post your knife making mission. I was a big "Forged in Fire" fan (my midweek look-forward-to) before the Choice TV channel was binned. I love making stuff and makers...low tech, high tech, hackers, bodgers, artisans, menders, crafters, fettlers, fiddlers, fudgers...I'd love to get some sort of community fab lab going.

When I get my knife/blade/edge sharpening shit together I'll show you my greenwood slick if you show me your drop-point seax, yeah? :winky:
I’ll start a thread tomorrow!! I’ve just bought a Lansky deluxe sharpening kit, excited to try it!
Fabulistic! I upgraded to the Lansky system a few years ago...if you feel yourself falling down the rabbit hole of fine edge fettling, guided systems are great to produce repeatable, and therefore quantifiable, sharpening/honing refinement to your procedure. Get hold of some magnification (loupe or similar handsfree thingy) and check/test your results often...dude, I'm sooo looking forward to your knife journey...I know you'll "do it clean, know what I mean" (Echo and the Bunnymen...Easter reference).

Here's some tool porn for yer...what I'm occupying my tool sharpening habit with this Easter weekend, in-between oogling the drillium, Porsche vid (banana for scale reference...is that still this site's unit of comparison?):



19th Century Greenwood Framing Slicks...fill yer boots, JB.jpg



They all date from the 1800s. Forge welded tool edge steel onto softer socket-end steel for shock resistance. They were used before the advent of timber, stud framing construction and the move to 'rough' carpentry using nails to replace mortice and tenon/pegged joinery. Not often used in A/NZ, if at all. You'd see this construction method in the timber houses from Tudor England and the barns of the eastern US (Amish dudes still build this way).

This was apex tech, back in the day. Slicks weren't struck with a mallet, rather, hand pushed to finish a tenon off like we might use a plane these days. They are deadly sharp, and if dropped, can easily cut through a leather boot, toes and rubber sole (don't ask me how I know...yeech). I've got to flatten the backs and bring the bevels back on them all. I'll secondary bevel the cutting edges to 25 or 30 degrees for soft or hard wood use from there. Gonna take hours... :thumbup:
Lovely! The local craft beer dispensary had a new wooden structure built outside for people to congregate under, was using a similar method of construction with wooden dowels etc to lock it all together, the council complained that there we no fasteners used so they had to add some but hid them under wooden plugs, very nice!
Polar Bear wrote: It will continue to be a mystery as to why this is such a sausage fest.

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by clubhouse »

'
jeremyb wrote: Fri Apr 15, 2022 5:03 pm
Lovely! The local craft beer dispensary had a new wooden structure built outside for people to congregate under, was using a similar method of construction with wooden dowels etc to lock it all together, the council complained that there we no fasteners used so they had to add some but hid them under wooden plugs, very nice!
Well now...here's a thing that bums me out a bit about A/NZ, and specifically in this case, the building regs...heavy timber framing joinery is a tried and tested construction method over centuries with many thousands of instances of dwellings and other structures lasting hundreds of years in all manner of conditions and exposure to changing environments across many countries...why the fuck A/NZ can't get a code of practice and construction around this :roll: ...I can only assume it's due to the vested interests of the construction corporates' and conglomerates' supply chains and manufacturing products.

The dowels don't carry substantive load. As you noted, they simply lock the tenon in the mortice. The tenon and mortice along with a small lip in the post carry the beam loads and they are sized to suit. The dowels are generally made of hardwood (oak or similar) driven through holes in the tenon/mortice joint that are slightly misaligned so that the dowel draws the tenon very tightly into the mortice. The dowel locks as solid as the joint...it will not wiggle loose unless the joint collapses. Some flex, in overstress, is assumed in the joint to dissipate energy in the structure and assist with carrying loads to ground rather than concentrating energy in point-loaded zones creating weakness. Steel bolts (and sometimes added plates) make the joints very rigid and so unable to dissipate energy, rather they transfer energy rigidly to beams and posts so causing them to load up considerably under overstress. The posts and beams then have to rely solely on mass to control and dissipate/transfer energy loads...they have to be massive, therefore loading up the structure again.

It's a misinterpreted understanding of the structural integrity of the mortice and tenon joint that sees an engineering 'solution' misappropriated where one is not required. Nails, bolts and screws are fasteners of 'rough' carpentry (Leo Fender, Taylor?, et al aside) and have no place in joinery. Although I obviously don't know the exact timber and construction methods used in this case, Japan has an extensive history and construction methodology using heavy timber framing and tenon/mortice joinery that could be used as a template to serve the council as it's also an area of the world highly susceptible to earthquakes and weather (typhoons) extremes...

Rant workshopped out...thank you and apologies, dear reader, as you were. :thumbup:

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by NippleWrestler »

The RG560 lives:

Image

I finally strung it up last night and setup the Floyd for the first time in over a decade and now waiting on the 7mm socket for the truss rod adjust.

We've got a new nut, new switch tip, new wiring, new bar, refurbed neck plate and back screws since Ibanez use proprietary ones that are short and fat (m4 x 15mm maybe).

Despite its age (1992) it doesn't look like it was played very much:

Image

I removed the corrosion with a wire brush, then sanded down and sprayed with black primer. You can still see the indents left by the corrosion:

Image

Looks like a Stealth bomber:

Image

That's the original pickups in there - a V2 humbucker and 2 x S1 single coils in the bridge. The 5 way wires 2 and 4 for parallel wiring, so even though the singles are around 9.5k and the HB is around 16k it comes out to around 8k and 4k when in in the in between positions. I thought that was a nice touch by Ibanez.

This is a very cool guitar but Floyd Rose bridges (or the Edge Lopro here) remain a pain in the ass.

Only things left are to replace the locking stud on the bar side of the bridge, and probably the claw screws on the back as they're almost stripped.

Image

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by Danger Mouse »

jeremyb wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 9:45 pm
clubhouse wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 8:49 pm
jeremyb wrote: Thu Apr 14, 2022 1:29 pm Tool porn!!! What do you do for a job dude??
Hey Jeremy...are you going to post your knife making mission. I was a big "Forged in Fire" fan (my midweek look-forward-to) before the Choice TV channel was binned. I love making stuff and makers...low tech, high tech, hackers, bodgers, artisans, menders, crafters, fettlers, fiddlers, fudgers...I'd love to get some sort of community fab lab going.

When I get my knife/blade/edge sharpening shit together I'll show you my greenwood slick if you show me your drop-point seax, yeah? :winky:
I’ll start a thre
ad tomorrow!! I’ve just bought a Lansky deluxe sharpening kit, excited to try it!
Oooo tell me more about the Lansky kit. I have a couple of whetstones and a decent steel for keeping a reasonable edge on my kitchen knives, but never been really happy with the results I get. I haven't really found any alternative though, but this sounds like a good upgrade.
The older I get, the more disappointed in myself I become.

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by Jay »

Cutting threads on a stainless steel tube by hand is quite demanding...

Making my own collets, vibrato arm, etc.

Image
When faced with quality, I recognise it every time.

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by Cdog »

Jay wrote: Mon Apr 25, 2022 9:14 pm Cutting threads on a stainless steel tube by hand is quite demanding...

Making my own collets, vibrato arm, etc.

Image
Nice... Custom design Vibrato then?

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by captainfruitbat »

NippleWrestler wrote: Wed Apr 20, 2022 10:18 am The RG560 lives:

Image

I finally strung it up last night and setup the Floyd for the first time in over a decade and now waiting on the 7mm socket for the truss rod adjust.

We've got a new nut, new switch tip, new wiring, new bar, refurbed neck plate and back screws since Ibanez use proprietary ones that are short and fat (m4 x 15mm maybe).

Despite its age (1992) it doesn't look like it was played very much:

Image

I removed the corrosion with a wire brush, then sanded down and sprayed with black primer. You can still see the indents left by the corrosion:

Image

Looks like a Stealth bomber:

Image

That's the original pickups in there - a V2 humbucker and 2 x S1 single coils in the bridge. The 5 way wires 2 and 4 for parallel wiring, so even though the singles are around 9.5k and the HB is around 16k it comes out to around 8k and 4k when in in the in between positions. I thought that was a nice touch by Ibanez.

This is a very cool guitar but Floyd Rose bridges (or the Edge Lopro here) remain a pain in the ass.

Only things left are to replace the locking stud on the bar side of the bridge, and probably the claw screws on the back as they're almost stripped.

Image
Looking really good.

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by jeremyb »

Jay wrote: Mon Apr 25, 2022 9:14 pm Cutting threads on a stainless steel tube by hand is quite demanding...
You need some of this Jean: https://tradetools.co.nz/products/rapid ... pint-473ml :thumbup:
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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by Jay »

Cdog wrote: Tue Apr 26, 2022 8:09 am
Jay wrote: Mon Apr 25, 2022 9:14 pm Cutting threads on a stainless steel tube by hand is quite demanding...

Making my own collets, vibrato arm, etc.

Image
Nice... Custom design Vibrato then?
No, not really. These are a drop-in replacement for a Yamaha SG-2, SG-3 and Yamaha SA-50. Quite often the vibrato arms are lost and the collet threads damaged due to not knowing how to adjust the collet domed nut.

My design is superior :moresarc: as it doesn't rely on 'nut tightening' to adjust arm movement. I use a teflon insert that keeps the arm tight in the collet while at the same time allowing it to move freely around IYKWIM.
When faced with quality, I recognise it every time.

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by Jay »

jeremyb wrote: Tue Apr 26, 2022 10:10 am
Jay wrote: Mon Apr 25, 2022 9:14 pm Cutting threads on a stainless steel tube by hand is quite demanding...
You need some of this Jean: https://tradetools.co.nz/products/rapid ... pint-473ml :thumbup:
Thanks, I am currently using Inox Mx3 which seems to do the job. Might check where yours is available in NZ and try it out.
When faced with quality, I recognise it every time.

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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by murky »

Always had a major boner for thin leather (think Page and Slash) - but without the stupid neck pad thingy.

Also always had a problem in that I couldn’t find straps long enough - Strap button to strap button I like: 1.65m for Strats/Teles, and 1.76m for LP’s.

Case-in-point: I purchased one from the US a while back - it was expensive (US$120+) and hasn’t lasted. The Red Monkey straps that Slash use are only 60”/152cm long (and US$188 plus shipping etc) - even these are a little short, I suspect he gets custom lengths made.

So….. I decided to make my own. ~$12 for russet strip leather (20mm or 25mm wide, 3.5mm thick). ~$2 for the ring/Chicago screws (needed to join two russet strips together as they were only 1.5m long). Punch the end holes just big enough to fit over the back of the strap button - strap lives on the guitar permanently, and there’s no way it’s coming off the front of the strap button and no need to faf with straplocks.

Best part - I can put a strap on every guitar I own, for about the same cost as one purchased strap…..

No frills. R n’ R. Done.
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Re: What's on your work bench?

Post by JoeBlow »

Beautiful Lester there, Murky.

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