Gear Aquisition Syndrome is a serious disorder.... FX etc

Moderators: Slowy, Capt. Black

#819817
jvpp wrote:
Slowy wrote:
jeremyb wrote:Farrrrrkkkk that's beautiful Dany!!!!

Have played. It's going to be a beautiful guitar when it's got some miles on it.


Adding scratches and dings will beautify it?









Logging out now

Hell yes!
And goodbye. :moresarc:

How's the amp coming on?
#819842
I have a serious lack of motivation right now. I'll walk into the 'guitar wardrobe', sit down for a mo, which guitar shall I play, ah, too hot, may as well have a summer ale.

Though I did manage to fit the TV Jones dynasonics to my Gretsch copy. Sounds phecking amazing, so I did sit down for 10 minutes today.
#819924
Slowy wrote:
jvpp wrote:
Slowy wrote:Have played. It's going to be a beautiful guitar when it's got some miles on it.


Adding scratches and dings will beautify it?









Logging out now

Hell yes!
And goodbye. :moresarc:

How's the amp coming on?

Yeah, how is my amp coming on?
#819925
jvpp wrote:
Slowy wrote:
jeremyb wrote:Farrrrrkkkk that's beautiful Dany!!!!

Have played. It's going to be a beautiful guitar when it's got some miles on it.


Adding scratches and dings will beautify it?

What he means (putting words into Slowy's mouth) is that an acoustic guitar needs at least 7 or 8 years of sonic vibrations moving the wood, particularly the top, for the molecular structure to change and the atoms in the wood align, making it more resonant and harmonically enhanced. Mr OIeg can explain this more scientifically.
#819939
Conway wrote:
jvpp wrote:
Slowy wrote:Have played. It's going to be a beautiful guitar when it's got some miles on it.


Adding scratches and dings will beautify it?

What he means (putting words into Slowy's mouth) is that an acoustic guitar needs at least 7 or 8 years of sonic vibrations moving the wood, particularly the top, for the molecular structure to change and the atoms in the wood align, making it more resonant and harmonically enhanced. Mr OIeg can explain this more scientifically.


You can buy a 'conditioner' (I think it's called) to do that - vibrating thing. But what if you vibrate it past the optimum point and it ends up sounding crap? Can you reverse-vibrate it and wind back the process? ;-)
#819941
Molly wrote:
Conway wrote:
jvpp wrote:
Adding scratches and dings will beautify it?

What he means (putting words into Slowy's mouth) is that an acoustic guitar needs at least 7 or 8 years of sonic vibrations moving the wood, particularly the top, for the molecular structure to change and the atoms in the wood align, making it more resonant and harmonically enhanced. Mr OIeg can explain this more scientifically.


You can buy a 'conditioner' (I think it's called) to do that - vibrating thing. But what if you vibrate it past the optimum point and it ends up sounding crap? Can you reverse-vibrate it and wind back the process? ;-)

Mr Oleg might be able to answer that. I don't know if it's possible to over vibrate... as the actress said to the bishop.
#819948
codedog wrote:One of these jobbies? https://www.tonerite.com/products/guita ... 1039781382


Cool, I'd not seen one of those devices before. There a lot of crap spoken about the aging of wood, but there is some solid research (in top journals such as Nature) to show that for acoustic instruments with a sound board (guitars, violins, etc) the molecular structure of the wood does indeed change slightly over time (it 'aligns') if the instrument is exposed to lots of vibration. It would also depend on many other things, such as humidity, the quality of the original timber and how it is cut and prepared.

In the olden days, we would park our new acoustic guitars next to our electric guitar amps or hi-fi speakers. It is a good argument for having them out of their cases and in a noisy environment.

For those interested:

D.G. Hunt and E. Balsan, “Why old fiddles sound sweeter”
Nature 379, 681 (1996)

J. Grogan, M. Braunstein and A. Piacsek, “An experimental
study of changes in the impulse response of a piece of a wood
plate that is subject to vibrational stimulus” Journ. Acoust. Soc.
Amer. 113 (4), 2315–2316 (2003)

Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1296207416300541


Or, you could just play the hell out of it! :D
#820009
olegmcnoleg wrote:
codedog wrote:One of these jobbies? https://www.tonerite.com/products/guita ... 1039781382


Cool, I'd not seen one of those devices before. There a lot of crap spoken about the aging of wood, but there is some solid research (in top journals such as Nature) to show that for acoustic instruments with a sound board (guitars, violins, etc) the molecular structure of the wood does indeed change slightly over time (it 'aligns') if the instrument is exposed to lots of vibration. It would also depend on many other things, such as humidity, the quality of the original timber and how it is cut and prepared.

In the olden days, we would park our new acoustic guitars next to our electric guitar amps or hi-fi speakers. It is a good argument for having them out of their cases and in a noisy environment.

For those interested:

D.G. Hunt and E. Balsan, “Why old fiddles sound sweeter”
Nature 379, 681 (1996)

J. Grogan, M. Braunstein and A. Piacsek, “An experimental
study of changes in the impulse response of a piece of a wood
plate that is subject to vibrational stimulus” Journ. Acoust. Soc.
Amer. 113 (4), 2315–2316 (2003)

Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1296207416300541


Or, you could just play the hell out of it! :D

Knew we could count on you! :thumbup:
#820014
olegmcnoleg wrote:
codedog wrote:One of these jobbies? https://www.tonerite.com/products/guita ... 1039781382


Cool, I'd not seen one of those devices before. There a lot of crap spoken about the aging of wood, but there is some solid research (in top journals such as Nature) to show that for acoustic instruments with a sound board (guitars, violins, etc) the molecular structure of the wood does indeed change slightly over time (it 'aligns') if the instrument is exposed to lots of vibration. It would also depend on many other things, such as humidity, the quality of the original timber and how it is cut and prepared.

In the olden days, we would park our new acoustic guitars next to our electric guitar amps or hi-fi speakers. It is a good argument for having them out of their cases and in a noisy environment.

For those interested:

D.G. Hunt and E. Balsan, “Why old fiddles sound sweeter”
Nature 379, 681 (1996)

J. Grogan, M. Braunstein and A. Piacsek, “An experimental
study of changes in the impulse response of a piece of a wood
plate that is subject to vibrational stimulus” Journ. Acoust. Soc.
Amer. 113 (4), 2315–2316 (2003)

Also: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1296207416300541


Or, you could just play the hell out of it! :D


In these days of bluetooth speakers, I'd drop one in the soundhole and play some drum n bass for 100 hours or so, no worries :)
#820024
Molly wrote:Very thorough, Oleg. First time I've seen Harvard referencing on this forum.

John Williams made a similar observation about his classical guitars; that they improved with prolonged use.

Steve in Dunners has a conditioner. He'll likely chime-in.


Cheers Molly.

Somewhat conversely, classical guitarists talk about guitars having ‘past their prime’. I’m not sure if this is just a way of bargaining the price down, or possibly even an excuse they use to their wife/partner for needing another one :-)
Maybe too much tension on the top over an extended period?
  • 1
  • 609
  • 610
  • 611
  • 612
  • 613
  • 620