Moderator: Capt. Black

#824504
Lawrence wrote:just a couple of minor points

Firstly...using a real amp will feel better if you are in the room with it because you are familiar with that. It will not sound better in the mix than say...any $500+ modeler from the last 15 years. Recording in the control room will feel odd if you are not used to it...BUT, your ears will last longer, the communication with the engineer will be better, and monitoring via speakers is much nicer than wearing headphones.

secondly...if it is an actual studio environment...perhaps trust the engineer to do their job. :thumbup:


yea, you are probably right.
I will re read this post a few times to break my will :oops:
#824506
DI now, reamp later.
#824507
mrmofo wrote:
griff7628 wrote:Build an iso box with some cheap ply.
Add reverb etc in mastering phase.


I almost have the time to do that. I might get that happening for next time
cheers for the reply


All good. Remember to line the inside with carpet or foam to avoid reflections.
You could cut 100mm hole in the side of the box to let sound out for monitoring.
#824510
Out of interest, which studio are you recording at?
What style of music you doing?

As Lawrence mentioned, trust the engineer to do their job. But I’m sure you can use your amp as long as there’s no practical limitations where you’re recording.

Personally I reckon the only genuine reason for absolute isolation from mic spill is if the playing is SOOOOOO bad that it has to be heavily doctored in post.
A bit of care with mic placement should be enough to allow heaps of flexibility in the mix.

Go have a listen to the tracks linked in my Marshall 2203 thread. That was tracked at Stebbings with the drums, TWO Marshall half stacks and an 8x10 bass rig in the main room together. There’s spill in all the mics but it’s low enough not to create a problem in the mix.
It helped that the performances were good enough we didn’t require any major overdubs. In fact because we were recording to tape and I knew the guys were up to it, if they weren’t happy with a bit of a take, I’d make them do the whole thing again. Always resulted in a better, more intense performance.

Go hard!
#824513
Lawrence wrote:just a couple of minor points

Firstly...using a real amp will feel better if you are in the room with it because you are familiar with that. It will not sound better in the mix than say...any $500+ modeler from the last 15 years. Recording in the control room will feel odd if you are not used to it...BUT, your ears will last longer, the communication with the engineer will be better, and monitoring via speakers is much nicer than wearing headphones.

secondly...if it is an actual studio environment...perhaps trust the engineer to do their job. :thumbup:


As an ex-engineer, this advice is gold :thumbup: :thumbup:

For the future, make it to pre-production meetings. All this stuff is discussed then and all questions answered. You get to know what can be done with the resources at hand, the time and your budget. You get to walk through the facility and get the vibe of it. Recording environments can be quite intimidating and sterile places to perform in so it's good to feel at home as much as possible before you're expecting to put on the performance of a life-time. Engineers don't really like to get involved in managing the talent, that's more a producer's role, so you're going to have to bring some thought to the table to get your best performance.

Capt. Black called it regarding bleed from sources into other mics. It's not too critical depending on genre. Lawrence called it regarding the ability of a good engineer to mitigate bleed to an inconsequential degree and the interplay between SPL/tone/comms/hearing/fatigue/comfort/etc

Tape can make you feel like a bug under a microscope. Try not to get "paralysis by analysis" syndrome. Have fun with it as much as you can :D and DON'T piss off the engineer! BUT have good, clean, professional fun :thumbup: :D Good luck
#824556
Sitting there waiting for everything to be set up, strumming through your guitar parts with so little effort it's like you were born with a guitar in your hands. Then..

"OH GOD THE RECORDING LIGHT IS ON, THE RECORDING LIGHT IS ON, WHY HAVE I SUDDENLY FORGOTTEN HOW TO PLAY GUITAR, HELP ME FINGERS, HEEEEEEELP?????"
#824560
Danger Mouse wrote:Sitting there waiting for everything to be set up, strumming through your guitar parts with so little effort it's like you were born with a guitar in your hands. Then..

"OH GOD THE RECORDING LIGHT IS ON, THE RECORDING LIGHT IS ON, WHY HAVE I SUDDENLY FORGOTTEN HOW TO PLAY GUITAR, HELP ME FINGERS, HEEEEEEELP?????"


Imagine how bad it must have been in the days of tape, at least these days you can delete the bits and bytes and re-do so easily :rofl:
#824562
jeremyb wrote:
Danger Mouse wrote:Sitting there waiting for everything to be set up, strumming through your guitar parts with so little effort it's like you were born with a guitar in your hands. Then..

"OH GOD THE RECORDING LIGHT IS ON, THE RECORDING LIGHT IS ON, WHY HAVE I SUDDENLY FORGOTTEN HOW TO PLAY GUITAR, HELP ME FINGERS, HEEEEEEELP?????"


Imagine how bad it must have been in the days of tape, at least these days you can delete the bits and bytes and re-do so easily :rofl:


In the tape days it was all genuine cut and paste (well cut and cello tape at least). Lots of skill in cutting and splicing bits of tape together to gets the best bits of each take and make sure you couldn't hear the cuts.

Now it's just done with mouse clicks.
#824566
Drums in the big main room, your amps it the small isolated room. I would be in the room with my amps if it were me, then sit in the control room when doing overdubs
#824583
Scooter13 wrote:I like recording in front of my amp too. The feedback and resonance with the guitar and amp interaction can be clearly heard in the final recording. Definitely not a dry clinical sound that seems to be prevalent in modern rock and metal music though.


Yeah it's totally noticable, as a guitarist, you hear an album and you go "pfffft, where's the feedback on that final chord - clearly his cab was in another room - lame". Sounds nitpicky but I do this all the time :rofl:

I will go out of my way to make sure I am in front of my amp when I'm recording distorted stuff, because there is that whole other layer of interaction and realness that happens.

The trick is to ask the rest of the band to leave the room :D "Oh gawd, Jae's doing his obnoxious loud thing again"... they don't get it!
#824584
out of interest some players (Slash for example) record in the control room but use a splitter and have a small combo in the control room, set up inches from the guitar, with a volume pedal, . Whenever the part needs a bit of feedback they press the pedal down and get interaction for a few seconds then shut it back off. A handy compromise.
#824613
I've got feedback in a control room, which was a surprise, but Arnie runs the monitors pretty loud. Arnie's monitor mix and delay always feels good, I don't know if it's the board compression or the studio delay, but he's played guitar a longer than I have so I assume he knows a thing or two.