All things guitar, Les Pauls, Strats, Teles, Tokai, Ibanez etc. etc. etc.

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#837725
#837727
Good news indeed, here's hoping it's not bolloxed up by a large corporate chasing marginal savings out of it's supply chain (cough Gibson) and buying from a cheap source selling undocumented (or worse) timber. Especially since all the other brands based in the US have worked hard to source ethical timber.
#837735
It's like all regulations though, a handful of scumbags fuck it up for a majority...and the regulators are attacked if they do nothing and rosewood (for instance) disappears forever as a species, and when the regulators do try and cover multiple countries with one law to save the species they get attacked...
Wanna buy some cheap furniture?
#837738
Terexgeek wrote:It's like all regulations though, a handful of scumbags fuck it up for a majority...and the regulators are attacked if they do nothing and rosewood (for instance) disappears forever as a species, and when the regulators do try and cover multiple countries with one law to save the species they get attacked...
Wanna buy some cheap furniture?


But it should be down to the manufacturers, not the general musician populace.
#837748
I read that the underlying reason for the over regulation of rosewood was increased demand from Chinese furniture manufacturers.

Apparently in China rosewood furniture is a traditional status symbol, and with tens of millions of Chinese moving from poverty to the middle class there has been an immense increase in demand for rosewood furniture so that they can show off their new purchasing power.

Because they were dealing with China CITES assumed that any loopholes or softness of regulation would be ruthlessly exploited, so they deliberately made the rules as draconican and inflexible as possible. Not sure how factual this is, just something i read on TGP.

Its important to remember that this opening up of regulations only applies to assembled guitars, so while its now possible to buy and sell guitars using rosewood internationally, its still just as hard as before for manufacturers to legally source the raw rosewood to build the guitars with - so the manufacturers that changed from rosewood to pau ferro / cardboard / etc will not be immediately going back to rosewood.
#837749
dylan wrote:Apparently in China rosewood furniture is a traditional status symbol, and with tens of millions of Chinese moving from poverty to the middle class there has been an immense increase in demand for rosewood furniture so that they can show off their new purchasing power.


I'd read that as well, so it was a quick hard move to stop it dead.

Its important to remember that this opening up of regulations only applies to assembled guitars, so while its now possible to buy and sell guitars using rosewood internationally, its still just as hard as before for manufacturers to legally source the raw rosewood to build the guitars with - so the manufacturers that changed from rosewood to pau ferro / cardboard / etc will not be immediately going back to rosewood.


I'd read that it included assembled guitars/musical instruments and finished musical instrument parts, so finished necks, bridges etc. would all be OK.

Yes the focus will be on manufacturers to source legally sound wood with all the required certificates before they can turn it into completed instruments or parts.

I don't think I have an issue with where it's got to now, seems to make a lot of sense, at least it now allows the movement of instruments around the world without fear of confiscation and destruction, although I'm not sure I'd want to be the first to travel with a vintage guitar or violin
#837750
The enforcement on instruments have been rather sporadic and seemed like it mostly affected shops/sellers who tried to follow the rules/not taking chances. NZ customs didn't give any fuck as far as I can tell.

Another funny thing is that I've seen plenty of supposedly "USA-only" Brazilian rosewood PRSi/Gibsons being brought over by parallel importers in other countries, despite BRW has been banned for export since the 90's...
#837869
*sigh* I guess it's good news, but will only come into effect from November this year

Update: On Wednesday 08/28/19, the CITES convention in Geneva, Switzerland decided to exempt finished musical instruments, parts, and accessories from CITES restrictions on all rosewood species except Brazilian rosewood (whose protections predate the other rosewood species and remain in place).

According to NAMM, the exemption for musical instruments will take effect in late November 2019. Until that time, all restrictions remain. Check back soon for more details.


source: https://reverb.com/news/cites-restricti ... -to-an-end