All things guitar, Les Pauls, Strats, Teles, Tokai, Ibanez etc. etc. etc.

Moderators: Slowy, Capt. Black

BY kwhelan
#778157
I wonder if in those early days there was a lot more changes in pickups or neck shape or wood as they experimented more each year. Perhaps even the luthiers were different or the paints. Ive obviously never played any of them but it is feasible that they were different beasts compared to the minor variations in later years judging by all the vastly different guitars he owns and obviously loves you'd have to assume its in his heart rather than just showing off
Molly wrote:
godgrinder wrote:
Unlikely - Chinese are a lot more interested in the CS/Reissue models than the regular ones nowadays. I've seen plenty deeming R9's not being high end enough and moving onto CC/True Historic/Murphy aged etc.


Was watching that Mike Campbell gear run-down thing on YouTube. He gets out his '59 LP and tells us it cost more than his house. He goes on to say that '58s were good and so were the '60s, but the '59 is the one, the best one.... FFS. I figured this is the ultimate in cork sniffing. To state that at this highest level there's still a best version and that the others are inferior? Bollocks.

For the record, his '59 was nothing to look at.
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BY StratMatt
#778158
foal30 wrote:
StratMatt wrote:If I want to bleat and moan about the Warriors I bloody well will!


Warriors and Phoenix both on tonight.


Nothing to bleat about as far as the Warriors were concerned tonight.
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BY Terexgeek
#778189
Molly wrote:
godgrinder wrote:
Unlikely - Chinese are a lot more interested in the CS/Reissue models than the regular ones nowadays. I've seen plenty deeming R9's not being high end enough and moving onto CC/True Historic/Murphy aged etc.


Was watching that Mike Campbell gear run-down thing on YouTube. He gets out his '59 LP and tells us it cost more than his house. He goes on to say that '58s were good and so were the '60s, but the '59 is the one, the best one.... FFS. I figured this is the ultimate in cork sniffing. To state that at this highest level there's still a best version and that the others are inferior? Bollocks.

For the record, his '59 was nothing to look at.

Not really the point, you can't look at the quality of the flame while you play it, you feel and hear it. I would rather an okay looking instrument that sings like angels climaxing on e, than a great looking one that sounds okay.
Please feel free to point out my hypocrisy with the saggy headstock of the Suhr. Please Mistress, the riding crop Mistress, thank you Mistress.
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BY Molly
#778206
Terexgeek wrote:
Molly wrote:
godgrinder wrote:
Unlikely - Chinese are a lot more interested in the CS/Reissue models than the regular ones nowadays. I've seen plenty deeming R9's not being high end enough and moving onto CC/True Historic/Murphy aged etc.


Was watching that Mike Campbell gear run-down thing on YouTube. He gets out his '59 LP and tells us it cost more than his house. He goes on to say that '58s were good and so were the '60s, but the '59 is the one, the best one.... FFS. I figured this is the ultimate in cork sniffing. To state that at this highest level there's still a best version and that the others are inferior? Bollocks.

For the record, his '59 was nothing to look at.

Not really the point, you can't look at the quality of the flame while you play it, you feel and hear it. I would rather an okay looking instrument that sings like angels climaxing on e, than a great looking one that sounds okay.
Please feel free to point out my hypocrisy with the saggy headstock of the Suhr. Please Mistress, the riding crop Mistress, thank you Mistress.


I expected that. The comment was an aside. Often those original LPs are stunning. His just happened to not be.
User avatar
BY jvpp
#778254
Terexgeek wrote:Hmm, Yamaha buying is not the dream scenario for New Zealand Gibson fans anyway. Don't get me wrong, I suspect I own more Yamahas than anyone here, I love their attention to detail and build quality (traditionally anyway). But, and it's a big but (hur, hur, big butt) they are a very conservative manufacturer with a very distant corporate structure. They will be very indifferent to microscopic markets like New Zealand, the whole range will be be pruned so only profitable lines are left and expect quality to improve, but Japanese manufacturing may become a part of the mix as part of the improvement. The distributors may find the relationship changed with the brand, Yamaha will be leveraging the whole range and expect different product lines to be purchased and minimum quantities. Don't expect artist relations to improve, unless they are huge and want essentially an existing guitar from the range with their name on the headstock. Expect little to no innovation, great you say, no Firebird X, yes but no chance of Gibson moving toward being a PRS, with lots of focus on guitarists or Fender, trying to have fun with the product lines. What could be great? Continued existence, but I don't think that is a real benefit, the brand is too valuable. My preferred buyer? PRS, but it's too small. Or maybe Fender, they are very respectful of brands and fans, but it might make them too bloated...


Yamaha used to be the Gibson distributor in Japan so there is some affinity. Consistent quality is good, fewer new models is good. Who cares about NZ, it is about the survival of the brand, which needs to be looked at on a global scale. Also, not really keen on seeing guitar heroes' name on a model. I don't think Santana ever got his name on one... I think they do a fair amount of liaising with the 'more important' guitar playing community. As always, not all pigs are equal.

Fancy a new headstock?

Poor photoshopping by yours truly on my 1967 Yammie.


Image
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BY Terexgeek
#778263
jvpp wrote:
Terexgeek wrote:Hmm, Yamaha buying is not the dream scenario for New Zealand Gibson fans anyway. Don't get me wrong, I suspect I own more Yamahas than anyone here, I love their attention to detail and build quality (traditionally anyway). But, and it's a big but (hur, hur, big butt) they are a very conservative manufacturer with a very distant corporate structure. They will be very indifferent to microscopic markets like New Zealand, the whole range will be be pruned so only profitable lines are left and expect quality to improve, but Japanese manufacturing may become a part of the mix as part of the improvement. The distributors may find the relationship changed with the brand, Yamaha will be leveraging the whole range and expect different product lines to be purchased and minimum quantities. Don't expect artist relations to improve, unless they are huge and want essentially an existing guitar from the range with their name on the headstock. Expect little to no innovation, great you say, no Firebird X, yes but no chance of Gibson moving toward being a PRS, with lots of focus on guitarists or Fender, trying to have fun with the product lines. What could be great? Continued existence, but I don't think that is a real benefit, the brand is too valuable. My preferred buyer? PRS, but it's too small. Or maybe Fender, they are very respectful of brands and fans, but it might make them too bloated...


Yamaha used to be the Gibson distributor in Japan so there is some affinity. Consistent quality is good, fewer new models is good. Who cares about NZ, it is about the survival of the brand, which needs to be looked at on a global scale. Also, not really keen on seeing guitar heroes' name on a model. I don't think Santana ever got his name on one... I think they do a fair amount of liaising with the 'more important' guitar playing community. As always, not all pigs are equal.

Fancy a new headstock?

Poor photoshopping by yours truly on my 1967 Yammie.


Image

The brand will survive without Yamaha, it's too valuable. The receivers will find someone, guaranteed, what is important is that it is the right buyer. I don't think Yamaha is. Just look at the way they have treated their own guitar products, they're good guitars, but the supply to the market gets turned on and off according to the greatest profit and as they don't mind not producing anything at all if it doesn't suit. Why? Pianos and saxophones and trumpets and violins and synthesizers et al may be making more cash right now...Corporate needs not guitar player needs. PRS (mostly) and Fender (sometimes) make money but not enough for a corporate, but enough for guitarists.
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BY GrantB
#779019
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